Monday, July 28, 2014

Home News California's Cottage Food Law Now In Effect

California's Cottage Food Law Now In Effect

Food Safety

New law allows people to sell homemade food to restaurants and grocery stores.

| January 7, 2013

The California Homemade Food Act went into effect on Jan. 1, which allows makers of homemade food to sell their goods to restaurants and grocery stores, Bloomberg Businessweek reports.

The law creates a new category of food production called a "cottage food operation," which can be operated out of a home kitchen. The law permits only "non-hazardous" types of foods to be sold, which are foods unlikely to grow harmful bacteria or other toxic organisms at room temperature, according to the Sustainable Economies Law Center

According to Bloomberg Businessweek, cottage food operators must attend a food safety class and pass an exam developed by the California Department of Public Health in order to sell their goods. Sellers must label their products, pay a small fee and submit to an annual kitchen inspection by health officials, according to Bloomberg.

Read the full Bloomberg story here, and read the final version of the bill here
 

 

Top news

Coca-Cola

Keeping “The Real Thing” Local Across the Globe

Walmart Drives Food Safety Standards

Walmart customers have an unspoken expectation that the products they buy will be safe, and Walmart’s Vice President of Food Safety Frank Yiannas drives fulfillment of that expectation through a culture of food safety throughout its stores—and its supply chain.

California Firm Recalls Chicken Products Due to Possible Salmonella

Foster Farms, a Livingston, Calif., based establishment, is recalling an undetermined amount of chicken products that may be contaminated with a particular strain of Salmonella Heidelberg, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced.

Ohio State Spinout Receives Investments to Commercialize Biosensor Technology

ProteoSense is developing a unique sensor technology invented by Ohio State College of Engineering and College of Medicine researchers to detect proteins that are fundamental markers of pathogens. The firm is focusing initially on detecting serious threats to food safety in fresh produce, such as salmonella, E. coli and listeria.

More Stores Affected by Listeria Fruit Recall

Wawona Packing Co. is voluntarily recalling peaches, nectarines, plums and pluots that were packed at its Cutler, California, warehouses between June 1 and July 12. Wawona believes the products may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.