FDA Initiative Educates Consumers on GMOs

FDA Initiative Educates Consumers on GMOs

The new education initiative, Feed Your Mind, is intended to help consumers better understand genetically engineered foods.

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March 10, 2020

FDA has created a new education initiative Feed Your Mind, intended to help consumers better understand genetically engineered foods, commonly called GMOs or genetically modified organisms

GMO foods have been available to consumers since the early 1990s, overseen by FDA, EPA, and USDA.

To help increase consumer understanding of GMOs, in 2017, Congress provided funding for an Agricultural Biotechnology Education and Outreach Initiative, calling upon FDA to work with EPA and USDA to share science-based educational information about GMOs, beginning with answers to some basic GMO questions.

As such, Feed Your Mind was developed to share science-based information that educates, informs, and broadens understanding about agricultural biotechnology for consumers. In its development, FDA obtained input from a broad group of stakeholders on this issue through two public meetings and a docket opened to receive public comments. Comments were received from individuals in all 50 states, Washington, D.C., and other countries. Additionally FDA examined the latest science and research studies relevant to consumer education and outreach to help inform the development of the initiative’s educational materials.

The Initiative is a multi-phased effort. The initial phase includes the new agricultural biotechnology website and a selection of fact sheets, infographics, and videos. These resources were based on extensive research that informed the development of educational and outreach materials.

Additional materials—including a supplementary curriculum for middle school classrooms, resources for health professionals, and additional consumer materials—will be released in late 2020 or early 2021.

Included in the initial Q&A publication, FDA addressed questions on the Agricultural Biotechnology Education and Outreach Initiative and its development; the goal and content of Feed Your Mind; and uses of the resources by other professionals.

All materials are available and downable from www.fda.gov/feedyourmind, and more information on the labeling requirement for foods that are genetically modified or “bioengineered,” including sample labels is available at www.ams.usda.gov/be.