FDA's Food Safety Modernization Act is 10 Years Old
The FDA's FSMA Turns 10
FDA

FDA's Food Safety Modernization Act is 10 Years Old

The Food and Drug Administration reflects back on its progress and the path forward with a message from Frank Yiannas, deputy commissioner for Food Policy and Response.

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January 4, 2021

FDA

To honor the 10-year anniversary of the Food and Drug Administration's Food Safety Modernization Act being signed into law, Frank Yiannas, deputy commissioner for Food Policy and Response, shares a look at FSMA's beginnings, progress and future. 

Ten years ago today, on Jan. 4, 2011, the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law and Congress’ mandate was clear: It’s not enough to respond to outbreaks of foodborne illness. We must prevent them from happening in the first place. FSMA was fueled by widespread concern among lawmakers, public health agencies, industry and consumers after multi-state outbreaks of foodborne disease had caused severe illnesses and deaths in thousands of people and animals in the United States. 
 
The result was the largest overhaul of the nation’s food safety system since the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act of 1938. 
 
A decade later, what can we say has been accomplished?  
 

Because of FSMA, those who grow, produce, pack, hold, import and transport our food are now taking concrete steps every day to reduce the risk of contamination. The result is safer food in this country, whether that food is produced domestically or imported.

Read the rest of his reflection here.