Tuesday, September 02, 2014

Home News Life Technologies and IMEGEN Develop Horse DNA Test

Life Technologies and IMEGEN Develop Horse DNA Test

International

The RapidFinder Equine ID Kit detects equine DNA from meat samples to help allay public concern, firms say.

| March 1, 2013

GLASGOW, U.K. - Life Technologies and Instituto de Medicina Genómica (IMEGEN) announced the development of the RapidFinder Equine ID Kit to detect the presence of equine DNA extracted from meat samples. The kit is optimized for its use in all Applied Biosystems Real-Time PCR Instruments, the firms said.

"As global leaders in food testing products, we recognize the importance of public confidence in knowing that the meat on their plate is safe to eat and is exactly what it says on the label," siad Nir Nimrodi, vice president and general manager for Animal Health & Food Safety, Life Technologies, adding that the RapidFinder Equine ID Kit will identify the presence of horse DNA from sample to result within the same day.

The RapidFinder Equine Kit is immediately available in Europe, Middle East & Africa and via Life Technologies distributors according to local regulatory requirements.

Top news

Coca-Cola

Keeping “The Real Thing” Local Across the Globe

A Meeting of the Minds

Nisus and NPD Products unite to swat away commercial client fly problems.

Walmart Drives Food Safety Standards

Walmart customers have an unspoken expectation that the products they buy will be safe, and Walmart’s Vice President of Food Safety Frank Yiannas drives fulfillment of that expectation through a culture of food safety throughout its stores—and its supply chain.

[Cover] McCormick Spices

In Ancient Greece and Rome, black pepper was used as a form of currency; in the fifth century its offering to conquerors twice spared the city of Rome; in the Middle Ages it was so valued, it was sold by the single peppercorn. And in the late 1800s, McCormick & Company, Inc., became a part of this rich history.

Peanuts Shipped With False Safety Documents

The former manager of a Georgia peanut plant knowingly shipped out peanuts with false safety documents, causing nine deaths and making over 700 more sick, Guardianlv.com reports.