Optibiotix to Launch Cholesterol and Blood-Pressuring Reducing Formulations for Food

Optibiotix to Launch Cholesterol and Blood-Pressuring Reducing Formulations for Food

UK-based Optibiotix, a developer of human microbiome modulators, is launching two new formulations for inclusion in supplements and foods which it says will help to reduce cardiovascular risk and manage heart disease.

March 17, 2017
Suppliers

UK-based Optibiotix, a developer of human microbiome modulators, is launching two new formulations for inclusion in supplements and foods which it says will help to reduce cardiovascular risk and manage heart disease.

The first formulation, CholBiome, will help reduce both cholesterol and blood pressure. The second, CardioBiome, in addition to reducing cholesterol and blood pressure, helps to maintain healthy blood vessels and reduces vascular inflammation.   These products will be unveiled in May at the Vitafoods Europe Trade Show\.

The scientific research behind these formulations was presented earlier this year at ProBiota by microbiologist and CEO of Optibiotix Stephen O’Hara, and showed that OptiBiotix’s microbiome modulators have successfully increased the growth and biological effect of multiple species of microbe in human gut models, including their own cholesterol-reducing probiotic, LP-LDL, the company said.

The research involved two separate studies. The first was carried out in collaboration with Glenn Gibson, professor of Food Microbiology, head of Food Microbial Sciences at Reading University, in a parallel, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study in healthy adults with normal to mildly elevated cholesterol. The results demonstrated that the bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum (LP-LDL) significantly reduces both LDL cholesterol and blood pressure, the company said, adding that the ability to reduce both LDL and blood pressure has a multiplicative effect in reducing cardiovascular risk.  The study also confirmed the safety profile of LP-LDL.

The second study conducted in collaboration with Professor Bob Rastall, professor of Food Biotechnology and head of Food and Nutritional Sciences at Reading University shows that OptiBiotix’s synbiotic was able to selectively enhance the growth and activity of LP-LDL in the human fecal microbiome, and so increase cholesterol reduction threefold. This is the first time that anyone has developed a synbiotic that increases the production and function of a specific bacterium in the microbiome, the company said.

The development of these new formulations is being taken up by both food and supplement manufacturers who are increasingly interested in incorporating proven formulations which help people control conditions such as heart disease and obesity through the modification of the human biome. For more information, visit http://www.optibiotix.com/