Friday, March 06, 2015

Home News Study Examines Allergenic Properties of Proteins in Browned Peanuts

Study Examines Allergenic Properties of Proteins in Browned Peanuts

Allergens

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and colleagues have shed light on the molecular differences between raw and heat-treated nuts in terms of their inherent peptides that trigger a human allergic reaction.

| December 20, 2013

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and colleagues have shed light on the molecular differences between raw and heat-treated nuts in terms of their inherent peptides that trigger a human allergic reaction. The study has helped to account in part for the increased allergenic properties observed in roasted peanuts, according to the researchers.

For the study, Soheila Maleki, a chemist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Food Processing and Sensory Quality Research Unit in New Orleans, La., worked with colleagues in Galveston, Texas and Beverly, Mass.
Previously, Maleki and colleagues had assessed the diagnostic reliability of standard peanut-allergy tests. She found that while people generally eat peanuts that have been heat treated (roasted or boiled), the extracts that are commonly used to diagnose peanut allergies are from raw peanuts. She hypothesized that raw peanut proteins undergo specific changes during roasting that may make them more likely to cause allergic reactions.

The major allergenic proteins (or allergens) of peanut are known as "Ara h 1," "Ara h 2," and "Ara h 3." For the study, the team looked into how the peanut-roasting process alters how well an allergic individual's immunoglobulin E (IgE) binds to peanut allergens.

The team compared the reaction by human IgE antibody to the heated and unheated forms of Ara h 1. The study showed that roasting-induced side reactions, such as browning, increased the amount of IgE that recognizes and binds to Ara h 1—when compared to the amount that binds to Ara h 1 from raw peanuts.
The study was published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research.
ARS is USDA's chief intramural scientific research agency.
 

Top news

Obama Proposes Single Head of Food Safety

The Obama administration wants a single new agency that would be housed within the Department of Health and Human Services to “provide focused, centralized leadership, a primary voice on food safety standards and compliance with those standards,” the administration said in its new budget request.

Researcher Discovers New Salmonella Serotype

Texas Tech University reports that Salmonella Lubbock will provide new avenues for research into the bacteria’s prevention.

FDA, Federal Partners Develop Improved Method for Attributing Foodborne Illness

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) have developed an improved method for analyzing outbreak data to determine which foods are responsible for illness related to four major foodborne bacteria.

NSF Training and Education Announces Food Safety Courses for Packaging

The organization announces dates and locations for HACCP for Manufacturing Food Packaging Materials and BRC Global Standard for Packaging and Packaging Materials.

GAO Says Additional Actions Needed to Help FDA's Foreign Offices Ensure Safety of Imported Food

A new report, released Friday by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), says the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) needs to do more to ensure that its foreign offices are keeping food imported to the U.S. safe.

x