Saturday, April 18, 2015

Home News Study Examines Allergenic Properties of Proteins in Browned Peanuts

Study Examines Allergenic Properties of Proteins in Browned Peanuts

Allergens

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and colleagues have shed light on the molecular differences between raw and heat-treated nuts in terms of their inherent peptides that trigger a human allergic reaction.

| December 20, 2013

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and colleagues have shed light on the molecular differences between raw and heat-treated nuts in terms of their inherent peptides that trigger a human allergic reaction. The study has helped to account in part for the increased allergenic properties observed in roasted peanuts, according to the researchers.

For the study, Soheila Maleki, a chemist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Food Processing and Sensory Quality Research Unit in New Orleans, La., worked with colleagues in Galveston, Texas and Beverly, Mass.
Previously, Maleki and colleagues had assessed the diagnostic reliability of standard peanut-allergy tests. She found that while people generally eat peanuts that have been heat treated (roasted or boiled), the extracts that are commonly used to diagnose peanut allergies are from raw peanuts. She hypothesized that raw peanut proteins undergo specific changes during roasting that may make them more likely to cause allergic reactions.

The major allergenic proteins (or allergens) of peanut are known as "Ara h 1," "Ara h 2," and "Ara h 3." For the study, the team looked into how the peanut-roasting process alters how well an allergic individual's immunoglobulin E (IgE) binds to peanut allergens.

The team compared the reaction by human IgE antibody to the heated and unheated forms of Ara h 1. The study showed that roasting-induced side reactions, such as browning, increased the amount of IgE that recognizes and binds to Ara h 1—when compared to the amount that binds to Ara h 1 from raw peanuts.
The study was published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research.
ARS is USDA's chief intramural scientific research agency.
 

Top news

GS1 Connect 2015 Conference to Offer Actionable Supply Chain Best Practices that Drive Business Growth

Speakers representing nearly 50 of the world’s leading organizations, including Abbott Laboratories, Best Buy, The Coca-Cola Company, The Kroger Company, Macy’s, Quality Supply Chain Co-op, Inc./Wendy's and Target will headline the GS1 Connect 2015 conference program.

FDA Releases Annual Summary Report on Antimicrobials for Food-Producing Animals

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has published its fifth annual report summarizing the sales and distribution data of antimicrobial drugs approved for use in food-producing animals.

Purdue President Daniels is Keynote Speaker at Global Food Security Symposium

Purdue University President Mitch Daniels will be a featured speaker at the annual Global Food Security Symposium in Washington, D.C., on Thursday (April 16).

Submit Your Idea to Change the Food System

The fourth BCFN YES! opened January 7, 2015; BCFN will be accepting applications until May 31, 2015. The contest is open to young researchers and university students under the age of 35.

FDA Encourages Comments to Help Update Food Ingredient Safety Assessment (Redbook)

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has begun the process of updating its current guidance on food ingredient safety assessment, commonly referred to as the Redbook, and is requesting input from the public.

x