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FDA Shutters Sunland Inc.'s New Mexico Plant

Salmonella

Under new FSMA authority, the food facility's registration has been rescinded in light of the recent Salmonella outbreak.

| November 27, 2012

PORTALES, N.M. - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has suspended the registration of Sunland Inc.'s New Mexico food facility as a result of the recent Salmonella Bredeney outbreak that has sickened 41 people across 20 states, FDA announced.

FDA cited the fact that the tainted peanut butter had been linked to Sunland, coupled with the company's "history of violations."

The Associated Press reports the facility is the U.S.'s largest organic peanut butter processor.

This was the FDA's first use of its registration suspension authority under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), which enables the agency to take such action when it is determined the facility in question has a reasonable probability of causing serious adverse health consequences, according to FDA.

The outbreak was linked to Trader Joe's Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut butter, manufactured by Sunland. Trader Joe's pulled the product from its shelves in September, and Sunland voluntarily recalled almond butter and peanut butter products manufactured on the same product line as the Trader Joe's Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut Butter between May and September, according to FDA. 

The letter from FDA notifying Sunland of the suspension can be read in full here. A full statement from FDA can be read here

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

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